Identifying Cancer Incidence and Clinical Research Sites 2

According to the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), 8.2 million people die from cancer worldwide each year. And that number is set to rise. To address the cancer epidemic, the UICC organizes World Cancer Day on February 4 of each year. The day was created “to raise awareness about the disease and to develop practical strategies to address the cancer burden.”

The 2015 World Cancer Day tagline is “Not Beyond Us,” which is intended to highlight that solutions to cancer care are within reach. Four key areas of focus support this theme. For each of the four areas, UICC defines targets to achieve by the year 2025 and the challenge to achieving these targets. UICC also describes how we can overcome the challenge to meeting their targets for each focus area. Learn more about each of the focus areas here:

Cancer Incidence and Clinical Research

Click to view U.S map illustrating cancer incidence and locations of enrolling cancer clinical trials.

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Joe Kim’s Mission to Inspire Everyone to Care About Clinical Research 4

Joe KimJoseph Kim serves as a Senior Advisor in Clinical Development Innovation at Lilly, focusing on developing and implementing innovative patient engagement solutions. He has spent over 15 years in the Pharma industry utilizing a unique approach that integrates his experiences working for Sponsors such as Shire and Merck, CROs, and technology vendors.

Joseph has a robust combination of experience that includes early and late phase clinical research, and a well known history of innovation in the clinical research industry, recognized as one of “20 Innovators Changing the Face of the Clinical Trials Industry” by CenterWatch in 2013. He holds a BS in Molecular Biology from Lehigh University and an MBA from Villanova. He can be reached at kim_joseph_p@lilly.com and on Twitter.

Tell us a little bit about yourself and how you got started in clinical research.

For starters, you should know that I did not come to clinical research through any natural career path. In fact, I had two other careers as a social worker and high school science teacher before landing in clinical research. My first role was as an entry level data manager. Quite comfortable with trying things on and pivoting quickly, my instinct was, “This isn’t for me either.” Given that I worked for a large pharma company (Merck), I was able to quickly learn about other roles and try them on too. My next move was as a garden variety study manager in psychiatric research. This was the old model, where it was you and a medical monitor doing everything from writing the protocol, to selecting sites, to reviewing data, to paying grants.

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Happy Holidays From the Lilly Clinical Open Innovation Team 1

Reindeer Beagle

Reindeer Beagle by Mark Evans is licensed under CC-BY-2.0

Thank you to everyone who has made 2014 such a wonderful year! We have thoroughly enjoyed the conversations with you all and truly value your perspective. The Lilly Clinical Open Innovation (LCOI) team looks forward to continued interaction with you in 2015.

As we bring this year to a close, we’ve had some time to review our recent work, some of which we previously shared here on our blog. We sponsored a Patient Engagement App Challenge, which eventually led to the LVJJ website. The LVJJ website is a pilot project to improve how we present information to patients and caregivers on study websites. We’ve also progressed on our target profiles project, which is aimed at building a consistent framework for clinical trial eligibility criteria. And we created the Lilly Innovation Site Advocacy Group, providing us with access to great feedback from research sites.

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A Guide to the Lilly COI API

Lilly COI API

Click the image to view an infographic about the Lilly COI API

Click to enlarge the infographic.

Click to enlarge the infographic.

As the Internet continues to mature and more people access the web through desktop and mobile apps, the need for APIs (Application Programming Interfaces) has never been more pressing. APIs provide a consistent, easy-to-use way for developers to access data that can be built into mobile apps or websites.

Since 2005, ProgrammableWeb has cataloged the world’s APIs and has become the de facto journal of the API economy. Today there are more than 12,000 APIs listed in the ProgrammableWeb directory, but only 2.07% of those APIs are health-related. Clinical research-related APIs are hardly present at all, accounting for just 0.07% of the APIs listed on ProgrammableWeb.

The Lilly COI API is at the center of our efforts to make it easier for people to find clinical trials that are right for them or their loved ones. The API was created to make publicly-available clinical trial information easier for people to understand and easier for developers to work with.

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