Celebrate Research Milestones on International Clinical Trials Day 1

The story of clinical trials is a story of progress. From the first documented experiment, to recent explorations of DNA sequencing in drug development, clinical research has played an important role in improving the health of people all over the world.

We’re glad that International Clinical Trials Day gives us an opportunity to celebrate this story every year. Last year, we imagined what James Lind’s scurvy study, widely believed to be the first controlled clinical trial, might have looked like on ClinicalTrials.gov. This year, we’re expanding our scope a little to bring you an interactive timeline of the history of clinical trials.

International Clinical Trials Day

Click the image to view The History of Clinical Trials interactive timeline.

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What is Informed Consent in Clinical Trials? 1

Imagine for a moment you are a patient considering clinical trial participation. Or perhaps you really are considering clinical trial participation (good for you)! Either way, let’s say you want to understand more about informed consent in clinical trials. If you are like most patients today, you’ll look to a search engine for answers. So go ahead and do that. Head to your favorite search engine and type “informed consent clinical trials.” I’ll wait right here for you to return.

What did you find in the search results?

Here is what we noticed. First, patients have to filter through a lot of information to find what they need. They might find regulatory documents intended for research professionals mixed in with introductory content about informed consent. Second, the introductory content available is primarily static text. This static text is helpful, but it’s not as rich or engaging as it would be if accompanied by visual or interactive media. In short, it’s not easy for patients to educate themselves about informed consent in clinical trials.

Click the image to view the interactive infographic.

Click the image to view the interactive infographic.

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Identifying Cancer Incidence and Clinical Research Sites 2

According to the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), 8.2 million people die from cancer worldwide each year. And that number is set to rise. To address the cancer epidemic, the UICC organizes World Cancer Day on February 4 of each year. The day was created “to raise awareness about the disease and to develop practical strategies to address the cancer burden.”

The 2015 World Cancer Day tagline is “Not Beyond Us,” which is intended to highlight that solutions to cancer care are within reach. Four key areas of focus support this theme. For each of the four areas, UICC defines targets to achieve by the year 2025 and the challenge to achieving these targets. UICC also describes how we can overcome the challenge to meeting their targets for each focus area. Learn more about each of the focus areas here:

Cancer Incidence and Clinical Research

Click to view U.S map illustrating cancer incidence and locations of enrolling cancer clinical trials.

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A Guide to the Lilly COI API

Lilly COI API

Click the image to view an infographic about the Lilly COI API

Click to enlarge the infographic.

Click to enlarge the infographic.

As the Internet continues to mature and more people access the web through desktop and mobile apps, the need for APIs (Application Programming Interfaces) has never been more pressing. APIs provide a consistent, easy-to-use way for developers to access data that can be built into mobile apps or websites.

Since 2005, ProgrammableWeb has cataloged the world’s APIs and has become the de facto journal of the API economy. Today there are more than 12,000 APIs listed in the ProgrammableWeb directory, but only 2.07% of those APIs are health-related. Clinical research-related APIs are hardly present at all, accounting for just 0.07% of the APIs listed on ProgrammableWeb.

The Lilly COI API is at the center of our efforts to make it easier for people to find clinical trials that are right for them or their loved ones. The API was created to make publicly-available clinical trial information easier for people to understand and easier for developers to work with.

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