The Lilly COI API and TrialReach: A Story of Innovation 19

tomThe following blog post is by Tom Krohn. Tom is the Chief Development Officer for TrialReach and is responsible for business development including clinical trial sponsor relationships, patient advocacy groups and research institutions. He has 25 years of experience across different sectors in health including large pharma, hospital & retail pharmacy, and the developing world. Most recently, Tom led the Clinical Open Innovation team at Eli Lilly with a focus on patient engagement, open data and business transformation. Tom is passionate about serving patients from their point-of-view while building sustainable and highly effective organizations.

Everyone Has a Story

Everyone has a story.  You.  Me.  Innovation.

About four years ago, a small group of Lilly employees started work on open innovation with a focus on improving public information to accelerate medical innovation. Barry Crist and I wrote a whitepaper that outlined a vision for clinical knowledge generation becoming participatory for all in the clinical research ecosystem, especially patients.  Participatory—that is the essence of an open network. It is at the core of open innovation.

With executive sponsorship and a case for action, we took these ideas and developed an open API which launched in 2012. We put Creative Commons copyleft licensing on the API to remove the friction that is the norm of the life-science industry. Then, open innovation happened.

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Identifying Cancer Incidence and Clinical Research Sites 2

According to the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), 8.2 million people die from cancer worldwide each year. And that number is set to rise. To address the cancer epidemic, the UICC organizes World Cancer Day on February 4 of each year. The day was created “to raise awareness about the disease and to develop practical strategies to address the cancer burden.”

The 2015 World Cancer Day tagline is “Not Beyond Us,” which is intended to highlight that solutions to cancer care are within reach. Four key areas of focus support this theme. For each of the four areas, UICC defines targets to achieve by the year 2025 and the challenge to achieving these targets. UICC also describes how we can overcome the challenge to meeting their targets for each focus area. Learn more about each of the focus areas here:

Cancer Incidence and Clinical Research

Click to view U.S map illustrating cancer incidence and locations of enrolling cancer clinical trials.

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A Guide to the Lilly COI API

Lilly COI API

Click the image to view an infographic about the Lilly COI API

Click to enlarge the infographic.

Click to enlarge the infographic.

As the Internet continues to mature and more people access the web through desktop and mobile apps, the need for APIs (Application Programming Interfaces) has never been more pressing. APIs provide a consistent, easy-to-use way for developers to access data that can be built into mobile apps or websites.

Since 2005, ProgrammableWeb has cataloged the world’s APIs and has become the de facto journal of the API economy. Today there are more than 12,000 APIs listed in the ProgrammableWeb directory, but only 2.07% of those APIs are health-related. Clinical research-related APIs are hardly present at all, accounting for just 0.07% of the APIs listed on ProgrammableWeb.

The Lilly COI API is at the center of our efforts to make it easier for people to find clinical trials that are right for them or their loved ones. The API was created to make publicly-available clinical trial information easier for people to understand and easier for developers to work with.

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Pinpointing Diabetes Prevalence and Clinical Research Sites 4

Click the image to view the full interactive map.

Did you know that in 2013 approximately 382 million people worldwide were living with diabetes? Prevalence is third highest in the U.S., where 22.1 million people were living with diabetes in 2011. That’s an increase of 39.5 percent since 2004. Though diabetes is common and rising in prevalence, individual awareness is low, both internationally and in the U.S. Awareness is key to preventing and managing diabetes. Internationally, 46 percent of diabetes cases are undiagnosed. In the U.S., one in four diabetics do not know they have diabetes. And only one in 10 of the 86 million pre-diabetic U.S. adults know about their condition.  Without weight loss and moderate physical activity, 15 to 30 percent of those with pre-diabetes will develop Type 2 diabetes within five years. Once people become diabetic, they are at higher risk of serious health complications and their medical expenses become twice as high. More…