What is Informed Consent in Clinical Trials? 1

Imagine for a moment you are a patient considering clinical trial participation. Or perhaps you really are considering clinical trial participation (good for you)! Either way, let’s say you want to understand more about informed consent in clinical trials. If you are like most patients today, you’ll look to a search engine for answers. So go ahead and do that. Head to your favorite search engine and type “informed consent clinical trials.” I’ll wait right here for you to return.

What did you find in the search results?

Here is what we noticed. First, patients have to filter through a lot of information to find what they need. They might find regulatory documents intended for research professionals mixed in with introductory content about informed consent. Second, the introductory content available is primarily static text. This static text is helpful, but it’s not as rich or engaging as it would be if accompanied by visual or interactive media. In short, it’s not easy for patients to educate themselves about informed consent in clinical trials.

Click the image to view the interactive infographic.

Click the image to view the interactive infographic.

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Iodine’s Approach to Simplifying Drug Information Reply

Photo by Ryan McGuire from Gratisography.com

Photo by Ryan McGuire from Gratisography.com

At Lilly COI, we remain keenly interested in new tools, models, technologies and approaches to addressing healthcare information challenges and to considering how they might be applied to improve clinical research. Through our online travels, we’ve recently come across Iodine and find some of the concepts within their approach worth sharing.

With thousands of prescription and over-the-counter drugs currently on the market, the process of trying to understand what you’re taking can be intimidating and confusing. The idea of reading all the tiny print on the package inserts can be overwhelming. And oftentimes, doing a Google search doesn’t provide much additional help. The search results can include articles from medical journals, websites that list basic drug information and side effects, and discussion boards where patients share their individual experiences with a drug. How do you find time to sift through all of that and make sense of it?

Similar problems plague the process of finding a clinical trial, and of getting access to easily understandable results of the trial afterward. Finding ways to streamline this information and make it more readily available to people is becoming an area of increasing focus. Companies like Iodine are providing us with some examples of how this can be done.

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